An awkward moment ….

At work yesterday, I was asked by a senior colleague to assist a new worker lift some heavy items as she was pregnant. She wasn’t an especially large woman but had a fairly substantial baby bump.

I followed her to the storeroom and saw her pick up a large box. I advised her not to do that and that I was there to lift the heavier things. She responded with ‘I’m not pregnant’. Awkward moment! I tried to ignore the comment and changed the subject. She went on with ‘I was pregnant last year and I’m trying to lose weight at the moment’. The awkwardness continued.

Thankfully, she wasn’t upset and I managed to complete the task quickly and escape quickly without further adding to my embarrassment.

I went back to the senior colleague and advised that the woman wasn’t pregnant. He responded without a raised eyebrow with ‘She was when I saw her last year’. Last year??! I’m no expert but a gestation period of 15 months is surely on the long side. To be honest, all I could do was laugh.

My embarrassment was shared. My manager (based again on my senior colleague’s advice), advised the woman to task it easy while she was pregnant. Thankfully, the woman took it all in her stride and found amusement in the fact that the manager went bright red when advised otherwise.

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I won’t be trusting that colleague again!

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Should I or shouldn’t I?

A higher opportunity has become available at work.

Positives:

  • I know I can do the job
  • It pays more than I receive now
  • It may open up other opportunities
  • I consider I would be competitive in winning the job

Negatives:

  • No variety to the role
  • A negative work culture
  • A fair percentage of lazy work colleagues
  • The work environment could be more pleasant

I’m enjoying the work at my current location and my colleagues overall are good to work with. Other than money, there is no reason why I would want to change.

However, I have a goal to retire early. The only way I can achieve that is to have more money. I have investment strategies in place but again, I need money to fund them.

I always recommend someone should do what they enjoy. At another time I would.

Decision made. Pain today to relax tomorrow.

I will apply today.

Sacrificing now for the long-term goal

My life at the moment:

  • Sleep
  • Work. Pick up overtime and extra shifts if possible
  • Eat
  • Shower/brush teeth
  • Train at gym
  • Feed cat (x several)
  • Shop for food. Buy sale options if possible
  • Renovate home to add value
  • Listen to podcasts
    • Property investing
    • Entrepreneurs
    • True crime
  • Review potential investment properties online
  • Watch TV
  • Blog
  • General home chores

What I’m not doing:

  • Socialising. I’m in a new city and haven’t made an effort to make friends outside of work to reduce obligation to socialise (I know, a bit sad)
  • Buying new clothes, except as a necessity. Work uniform supplied and live in t-shirts and tracksuit pants the rest of time
  • Drinking alcohol excessively (a couple of beers weekly now only)
  • Eating out. Very occasional pizza ordered with savings coupon
  • Spending money on entertainment. i.e. cinema

Sound boring? Yeah, it kind of is but I’m suffering for my goal at the moment. My main thought at the moment is money, with the goal of not having to worry about money in 5 years. My goal is so strong that my boring life doesn’t feel boring. I have a purpose and I feel motivated daily.

My lifestyle up to now has been less than financially effective. Though I have managed to accrue a little money through property capital gain, I really haven’t saved a considerable amount and definitely not enough to retire.

5 years is a fair time to go without but I’m putting it in perspective. If the next 5 years of sacrifice allows me to relax in retirement, the time is well worth it.

Embarrass the lazy with your work ethic

Quite a few years back (maybe decades in fact), a new member joined the team. He turned up first day professionally dressed with nicely pressed shirt and pants and wearing a tie. He was a friendly guy but other than on scheduled breaks, he didn’t join in with social banter. He kept his head down and worked hard.

A few days into his work, I advised him that he could ease up a bit on his work output and there was no need to wear a tie. He politely thanked me for my advice and got back to his work. He continued to wear a tie and work hard every day.

After a while, the new guy started to make me uncomfortable. Definitely, he had done nothing wrong. His work was of a high quality, he arrived punctually for work and didn’t leave until he completed his work for the day. He took the minimum break allowed and only occasionally took coffee breaks. Even then, he would take his coffee back to his desk and drink rather than chat in the lunchroom. What was really making me uncomfortable was that he was making me embarrassed about my own work ethic.

I did arrive early for work but for the first half hour (at least), I would sip on a coffee, catch up on gossip with colleagues and send a few social emails. I would then work for an hour or so then take another break to wander around the office and say hello to people. Oftentimes I would spend a substantial part of the day sending out emails with regard to social activity for the weekend. In all honesty, I probably spent 3-4 hours at most at constructive work.

The new starter was putting me to shame and I felt it. He looked professional and acted it. I turned up primarily for my social agenda and to pick up an undeserved pay cheque.

Not surprisingly, the new starter received a higher opportunity after only a few months at work. Initially, I was annoyed as I had been there longer and blamed politics. After reflection though, and thankfully before I said anything stupid, I realised he deserved it a great deal more than me.

Admittedly, it did take me a few more years to really learn the lesson. I had started a new job and I committed myself to start fresh with the right attitude. I presented myself professionally daily and worked hard. If the end of the day came and I still needed to complete something, I would stay back to finish. I would regularly contribute ideas to make work more productive for the customer, even if it would occasionally result in more work for me. Funny enough, one of my colleagues said exactly what I had said previously, take it easy with the work and a tie isn’t necessary.

Little surprise when only a few months into the job I received an opportunity at a higher level. And guess what, I enjoyed my work a great deal more when I actually felt like I was making a positive contribution.

I have continued to present myself as a professional and work hard through several more jobs. I have frequently received higher opportunities and praise from managers. I also receive many comments from colleagues to pace myself with my work and dress more casually. I wonder if they are as embarrassed as I was a couple of decades earlier.

Whatever you do, do it great!

“If a man is called to be a street sweeper, he should sweep streets even as a Michaelangelo painted, or Beethoven composed music or Shakespeare wrote poetry. He should sweep streets so well that all the hosts of heaven and earth will pause to say, ‘Here lived a great street sweeper who did his job well.

Martin Luther King Jr

A great quote! Whatever the job is, do it to your best. Never consider a job too small or below you.

If an opportunity arises, don’t let your work ethic or attitude be the reasons you miss out.

Positive influences – It starts at home

This post is somewhat of an extension to Surround yourself with people that challenge you to grow.  Surrounding yourself with the right people is not especially challenging if you are motivated enough and have the courage to distance yourself from the people who bring you down.

However, over the last week, I have encountered several cases where the above is not really an option. That is, by having parents that are poor influences. Again, I am relying on my experiences at work where I have high-volume customer contact.

Example 1 relates to two separate cases where I was approached by an adult and a child. My role on the night was to advise that the trains weren’t running due to track maintenance and to provide them with options for Rail Bus travel. An inconvenience but not the end of the world. In both situations, I was in the middle of discussing the correct bus when the ‘adult’ turned away from me angrily and stated variations of ‘F**k off, you guys are hopeless’.

I’m big enough, old enough and ugly enough to let abuse roll off me. I all but forget the interaction immediately and move onto the next customer with a smile. However, how does this influence the child? They absorb that aggression and verbal abuse are the manner to interact with people when things don’t go their way.

Example 2 relates to a middle-aged woman who was visibly shivering on a platform. It was only slightly chilly, so I approached her to see if she was ok and if she needed an ambulance. Her son (so I found out later) pipped up to say she was ok and that she just had a ‘dirty shot’.

The son was in his early 20’s, barefoot and his clothes were clearly dirty. I will note also he was smoking on the platform in the middle of customers and I had to tell him to put the cigarette out as it was illegal.

I contacted my manager for advice. I found out that both the mother and son were well-known to police, with extension drug histories, aggressive behaviour towards customers and staff and never paid for tickets.

Again, what hope did this kid have to grow up to be a positive contributor to society? His main influence was an antisocial drug addict mother.

I’m sure there are countless examples of people with poor influences who have grown to be beautiful people and achieved amazing things. However, I will bet that the majority of children that grow up with poor parenting influences follow a very similar path.

For a number of reasons, I never became a parent. But surely when you have a child, the world becomes more than just you. Children are sponges and on the whole, look up to their parents.

Maybe if you can’t create a positive environment for your children, parenting might not be for you. How do you want your child to grow up? Think about what you say and do.

Self-limiting beliefs – Not for Cathy Hughes!

One of the biggest obstacles to success is having self-limiting beliefs. I’m definitely a victim to self-limiting thinking. Often I’m caught myself in doubt due to my age, lack of education, my mental health issues, financial situation or whatever else I can find in the dark recesses of my mind.

I came across a wonderful podcast today on How I Built This. This episode featured Cathy Hughes . Cathy is the founder of Radio One. She is now 70 years old and has a net worth of over $500 million.

I won’t go into every detail of Cathy’s story and recommend you listen to the podcast and read Wikipedia. The major points that I took from Cathy’s story is that she had no self-limiting beliefs. She had a goal and had no doubt that she would achieve it.

However, Cathy had several potential obstacles that many would consider insurmountable to achieve even minor success:

  • Lived in housing projects as a child
  • Was a single mother at 17
  • Is an African American woman
  • Lived in middle America
  • She started her career in the 60’s and 70’s, which I understand was a less enlightened time in the US for African Americans (I’m from Australia, so I wasn’t there to experience it)

Cathy apparently faced discrimination in her early days but again, she maintained focus on her goal and never doubted she would succeed.

Again, I won’t go into her whole story but one story she recounted was approaching financial institutions for a $1 million loan with only $10,000 in the bank. She went to 32 banks before getting the loan. 90% of people would give up after 2 or 3 banks but not Cathy. She said that she believed in the law of averages that every ‘No’ is one step closer to a YES. It is not hard to believe that she would have gone to 100 banks if she had to.

What if we all had the same confidence as Cathy that we would succeed despite self-imposed limits? Very few will achieve the success that Cathy has. Without question though, the person that follows a passionate goal without thought of failure will be far more successful then the one that finds reasons they can’t.